25 June 2011

John Newcomb 1751 - 1834

From B.M. Newcomb's book:

While residing at Cape Ann, he enlisted, May 1775, for twelve months in Capt. Nathaniel Collins' Co., marched to Cambridge and arrived on the day of the battle of Bunker Hill. He joined Col. Moses Little's regiment, and a few days after left for Prospect Hill, where he was employed in throwing up breastworks during the day and standing guard at night. He also served in Joseph Robey's Company. When Collins was promoted to major, Warner became captain of Collins' Company.

In Jan 1776, he enlisted for eight months as corporal in Capt. William Pearson's Co., Col. Porter's regiment, and rendered service at Cape Ann. In about one month he was appointed sergeant; discharged 15 Aug 1776.

In Apr. 1777 he volunteered to serve in the army on North River - term of service three years - and joined Capt. James Carr's Co., Col. Little; marched from Boston to Albany, where he was detached, with some hundreds of others, under Gen. Arnold, to relieve Fort Stanwix, then besieged. He marched to Stillwater, joined the artillery under Maj. Bannister, and was present at the capture of the army of Gen. Burgoyne. Ordered to Albany, and was there appointed to drive the baggage-wagon of Gen. Gates home.

He was in a privateer fitted out at Machias, Me.; was taken by a British man-of-war; was prisoner on board the British ship Jersey in New York harbor with Andrew, his cousin, but escaped; and sailed in a privateer from Cape Ann, capturing several prizes.

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